Thursday, December 11, 2014

Cream

"CIA Torture Pseudonyms"

"The man detained over CIA 'torture' report" "Instead of prosecuting torturers, Obama prosecuted the guy who revealed the program"  "Imprisoned CIA Whistleblower John Kiriakou Blasts Bureau of Prisons’ ‘Strident Anti-Family’ Policies"

"Torture is Good?" by Chris Floyd:
"A truncated version of the Senate investigation into the CIA’s Terror War torture regime has finally been released. Even in its limited form, it details an operation of vile depravity, one which would plunge a civilized nation into a profound crisis of conscience and spark a deep and anguished debate on how best to transform a system of government — and a national ethos — that could lead to such putrid crimes. It would also occasion a wide-ranging effort to subject the originators, perpetrators and accomplices of the torture program to the full measure of legal punishment they deserve.
Needless to say, nothing like that is going to happen in America. Indeed, even before the report was released, the New York Times — the standard-bearer and shaper of “decent” liberal thought for the nation — was splashing an opinion piece on the front page of its website, demanding that we “Pardon Bush and Those Who Tortured.” This was the very first “think piece” pushed by the Times on the morning of the report’s release."

"Jose Padilla's dirty bomb"  "How To Go About Making An H - Bomb:  Fact Or Fiction? : You Tell Me":
"NOW YOU HAVE TO CONVERT YOUR URANIUM TETRAFLUORIDE TOANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE - THE GASEOUS FORM OF URANIUM, WHICH IS CONVENIENT FOR SEPERATING OUT THE ISOTOEU235 FROM U-238.
     TO GET THE HEXAFLUORIDE FORM, BUBBLE FLUORINE GAS INTO YOUR CONTAINER OF URANIUM TETRAFLUORIDE.LUORINE IS AVAILABLE IN PRESSURIZED TANKS FROM CHEMICAL-SUPPLY FIRMS.  BE CAREFUL HOW YOU USE IT, HUH, BECAUSE FLUORINE IS SEVERAL TIMES MORE DEADLY
THAN CHLORINE, THE CLASSIC WORLD WAR I POISON GAS.  CHEMISTS RECOMMEND THAT YOU CARRY OUT THIS STEP ER A STOVE HOOD (THE KIND USED TO REMOVE UNPLEASANT COOKING ODORS).
     FIRST TRANSFORM THE GAS INTO A LIQUID BY SUBJECTING IT TO PRESSURE.  YOU CAN USE A BICYCLE PUMPR THIS.  THEN MAKE A SIMPLE HOME CENTRIFUGE: FILL A STANDARD-SIZE BUCKET ONE-QUARTER FULL OF LIQUI RNIUM HEXAFLUORIDE.  ATTACH A SIX-FOOT ROPE TO THE
 BUCKET HANDLE.  NOW SWING THE ROPE(AND ATTACHED BUCKET) AROUND YOUR HEAD AS FAST AS POSSIBLE.  KEEPIS UP FOR ABOUT 45 MINUTES.  SLOW DOWN GRADUALLY, AND VERY GENTLY PUT THE BUCKET ON THE FLOOR.  TH -35, WHICH IS LIGHTER, WILL HAVE RISEN TO THE TOP WHERE IT CAN BE SKIMMED OFF LIKE CREAM."

"Poitras: Guardian Had a Freak-Out Moment and Destroyed Some GCHQ Docs in Hong Kong"  'Freak-out' is a polite way of saying The Guardian was acting as an asset of British intelligence.

"Isis: the inside story" (very close to simply stating that ISIS is a creation of the American government):
"But at the time of his stay at Bucca, Baghdadi’s group was little-known, and he was a far less significant figure than the insurgency’s notional leader, the merciless Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, who came to represent the sum of all fears for many in Iraq, Europe and the US. Baghdadi, however, had a unique way to distinguish himself from the other aspiring leaders inside Bucca and outside on Iraq’s savage streets: a pedigree that allowed him to claim direct lineage to the Prophet Muhammed. He had also obtained a PhD in Islamic studies from the Islamic University of Baghdad, and would draw on both to legitimise his unprecedented claim to anoint himself caliph of the Islamic world in July 2014, which realised a sense of destiny evident in the prison yard a decade earlier.
“Baghdadi was a quiet person,” said Abu Ahmed. “He has a charisma. You could feel that he was someone important. But there were others who were more important. I honestly did not think he would get this far.”
Baghdadi also seemed to have a way with his captors. According to Abu Ahmed, and two other men who were jailed at Bucca in 2004, the Americans saw him as a fixer who could solve fractious disputes between competing factions and keep the camp quiet.
“But as time went on, every time there was a problem in the camp, he was at the centre of it,” Abu Ahmed recalled. “He wanted to be the head of the prison – and when I look back now, he was using a policy of conquer and divide to get what he wanted, which was status. And it worked.” By December 2004, Baghdadi was deemed by his jailers to pose no further risk and his release was authorised.
“He was respected very much by the US army,” Abu Ahmed said. “If he wanted to visit people in another camp he could, but we couldn’t. And all the while, a new strategy, which he was leading, was rising under their noses, and that was to build the Islamic State. If there was no American prison in Iraq, there would be no IS now. Bucca was a factory. It made us all. It built our ideology.”
As Isis has rampaged through the region, it has been led by men who spent time in US detention centres during the American occupation of Iraq – in addition to Bucca, the US also ran Camp Cropper, near Baghdad airport, and, for an ill-fated 18 months early in the war, Abu Ghraib prison on the capital’s western outskirts. Many of those released from these prisons – and indeed, several senior American officers who ran detention operations – have admitted that the prisons had an incendiary effect on the insurgency.
“I went to plenty of meetings where guys would come through and tell us how well it was all going,” said Ali Khedery, a special aide to all US ambassadors who served in Iraq from 2003-11, and to three US military commanders. But eventually even top American officers came to believe they had “actually become radicalising elements. They were counterproductive in many ways. They were being used to plan and organise, to appoint leaders and launch operations.”
Abu Ahmed agreed. “In prison, all of the princes were meeting regularly. We became very close to those we were jailed with. We knew their capabilities. We knew what they could and couldn’t do, how to use them for whatever reason. The most important people in Bucca were those who had been close to Zarqawi. He was recognised in 2004 as being the leader of the jihad.
“We had so much time to sit and plan,” he continued. “It was the perfect environment. We all agreed to get together when we got out. The way to reconnect was easy. We wrote each other’s details on the elastic of our boxer shorts. When we got out, we called. Everyone who was important to me was written on white elastic. I had their phone numbers, their villages. By 2009, many of us were back doing what we did before we were caught. But this time we were doing it better.”
According to Hisham al-Hashimi, the Baghdad-based analyst, the Iraqi government estimates that 17 of the 25 most important Islamic State leaders running the war in Iraq and Syria spent time in US prisons between 2004 and 2011. Some were transferred from American custody to Iraqi prisons, where a series of jailbreaks in the last several years allowed many senior leaders to escape and rejoin the insurgent ranks."

"US agency infiltrated Cuban hip-hop scene to spark youth unrest"

"Libya: Be careful what you wish for"

"These are lies the New York Times wants you to believe about Russia" by Patrick L. Smith

"Cheney Calls for International Ban on Torture Reports" by Andy Borowitz
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