Sunday, August 18, 2019

Head-scratcher

"Khazarian Mafia Rules: Israel Put Trump in White House, Khazarian Mafia Keeps Him There" (Johnson).  More essential background, albeit dated, for the bizarre state of modern American politics.

"Sarin in Syria: chemistry, and cui bono?" (Roddis).  Another blood-pouring-from-the-fangs Zionist hiding his single-minded supremacism behind another veil, in this case 'marxism'.  This is a common trick, Monbiot is an 'environmentalist', Noam's an 'anarchist'.  Why do we keep falling for this?

"More questions about how Jeffrey Epstein got island-owning rich" (Nocera) (some of the mechanics on how one macher funded at least part of the Mossad blackmail operation):
". . . the L Brands financial disclosure documents from the 1990s and 2000s suggest that their relationship was even closer than that. In Schedule 13D documents filed with the SEC from that era, Epstein is listed as a trustee — sometimes with Wexner, sometimes by himself — on a handful of Wexner trusts, including several for Wexner’s children. Some of the transactions in the 13Ds raise the possibility that Wexner may have paid Epstein by letting him sell L Brands stock out of those trusts.
For instance, in a 13D filed in late March 2002, Epstein is listed as trustee or co-trustee for the Wexner Children’s Trust II, which held 1.3 percent of L Brands stock, as well as something called Health and Science Interests II, which held 3 percent of the shares. (Wexner himself held 15 percent of the stock.) The document shows that on March 26, Wexner moved 15 million shares, worth over $250 million, from the Wexner Children’s Trust, which he solely controlled, to the Health and Science Interests II, where he was a co-trustee with Epstein. The next day, Health and Science Interests II sold 49,800 shares at $17.50 a share.
It is possible that the sale was simply a diversification move — though, as I noted earlier, Epstein had never registered with the SEC as an investment professional. It seems more likely that it was a way to put money in Epstein’s pocket. There are a half-dozen 13Ds that show a similar pattern: Wexner transfers L Brands stock from trust he solely controls to one where Epstein is a trustee. Within days, the Epstein-managed trust sold the stock. (An L Brands spokesperson would not respond to any questions about Epstein’s involvement in Wexner’s trusts.)
It is impossible to know for sure whether the proceeds from those stock sales wound up in Epstein’s pocket, because we don’t have access to his tax returns. But it is a very real possibility."
and:
"What is striking about the two Epstein foundations that filed 990s is that they don’t contain any contributions from Epstein himself, despite his supposed wealth. In the case of C.O.U.Q., its entire corpus came from — you guessed it — Wexner.
In late February 2002, Wexner, through the Wexner Children’s Trust, gave the C.O.U.Q. Foundation 600,000 shares of Too Inc., worth $11.2 million. (Too Inc. was the stock of the Limited Too.) A year later, Wexner made a $10 million donation to C.O.U.Q., this time through the Wexner Charitable Fund. The three trustees of the Wexner Charitable Fund were Wexner; his wife, Abigail; and Epstein.
But why? Why would Wexner give millions to Epstein’s charity? Wexner’s best-known charity, the Wexner Foundation, was devoted to “developing Jewish professionals, volunteer leaders and leaders in Israel.” In 2002, it had a corpus of over $80 million. Wexner gives it millions of dollars every year.
So why did he feel the need to contribute $21 million to Epstein’s foundation? Was it a form of payment? Documents alone cannot answer this question. They can only raise it.
Did Epstein really donate $46 million to a Wexner foundation prior to going to prison in 2008?
Technically, the answer is yes. But the transaction is a head-scratcher. Here’s the sequence of events: In December 2007, a new foundation was established called the YLK Charitable Fund. It had two trustees: Wexner’s wife, Abigail, and Peggy Ugland, a longtime Wexner employee. This took place two months after Epstein had agreed to his now infamous plea deal in Florida. Few people knew about the plea, however, because the agreement was still under seal.
In January 2008 — one month later — Epstein transferred $46 million to Abigail Wexner’s new foundation, $14 million of which came from C.O.U.Q. and the rest from Epstein’s company. Among the conditions: YLK had to account for Epstein’s money “separately on its books and records.”
Just three years later, with Epstein out of prison, the YLK Charitable Fund shut down, having made exactly two donations. The money that remained — some $33 million — was then folded into yet another of Wexner’s foundations, the Wexner Family Charitable Fund.
Why would Abigail Wexner set up a foundation solely to accept money from Epstein? Why would it remain largely dormant for the next three years? What happened to the money once it was transferred to the Wexner Family Charitable Fund?"
What follows in the article is a difficult-to-believe cohencidence explanation for the idea that Epstein won the Powerball.  See here for more diving down the rabbit hole!:  "No, Jeffrey Epstein did not win $25-million from an Oklahoma lottery ticket… or did he?!".  Even at face value, the Oklahoman attempted debunking is so vague as to be useless.

More (I just start laughing when I read these articles!):  "In Past Ties Between Leslie Wexner and Jeffrey Epstein, Troubling Questions About Elite Philanthropy" (Cohen).

The funniest thing is the Wexner will almost certainly recover whatever money is left on the basis that it was 'misapppropriated', and the victims will get judgments against the estate which will remain unpaid as there will be no assets left.  Sorry, goyim!
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